Organizing a Rally with Tips from NGP Van

Published on Author Androidita

Holding a great rally can help to win an election. NGP Van offers some helpful advice starting with determining if a rally is right for your campaign. Timing is everything. Rallies are expensive and time consuming so knowing the right time for a rally is vitally important. Most rallies take place at the beginning of a campaign to announce candidacy and at the end of the campaign to rally voters.

Next, planning the details is probably the most important factor to the success of the rally. Start out by finding a location which will be easily accessible to press and attendees. Using a symbolic platform or a local business could increase attendance. Once you have a good location then work on an excellent sound system. People must be able to understand what you are saying during a rally. Good visuals will help to extend the reach of the rally after the event through the news and social media. Then write an amazing speech. Don’t bore your audiences with statistics. Excite them with your campaign’s top-line messages.

Now it is time to get the word out by advertising. Print flyers and ask volunteers to hand them out. Use Facebook to create an event which can be easily shared. Talk to local radio stations, television stations, and newspapers about press releases. Local news blogs are also a great way to advertise.

Finally, turn the energy generated by the rally into a grassroots action to ensure your rally’s success. Ask volunteers to greet attendees as they enter the rally. Get people to write their names, phone numbers, and email addresses down for future reference. Toward the end of the rally, ask volunteers to walk through the crowd with a signup sheet for future events.

Why use NGP Van? They offer an integrated technology platform for fundraising, organizing, compliance, field and social networking. Major Democratic campaigns in all 50 states use the NGP Van system. These systems have helped to elect such leaders as Former President Barack Obama and Senator Elizabeth Warren through strategy, organizing, and fundraisers.